gabbi |
lots of all kinds of things. NIALL GIRL.
NEXT
But does it matter that two middle-aged men with very large platforms were sitting at a table pathologising teenage girls’ sexuality – and making a whole load of potentially harmful assumptions about a topic they know literally nothing about? Absolutely. —

elizabethminkel wrote in newstatesman article, “Why it doesn’t matter what Benedict Cumberbatch thinks of Sherlock fan fiction

Finally, a mainstream media article that presents the human side of fandom, and talks about why it’s important to have alternative forms of media. 

I fangirl this woman so hard right now. 

(via foxestacado)

"Fan fiction, fan art, the way female fans celebrate what they love: this stuff isn’t a secret anymore – and it shouldn’t be a punch line anymore, either. It’s a big messy world full of amateur writing and unedited work, but it’s also got of some of the best fiction I’ve ever read, published or otherwise. You don’t have to participate in it to afford it even a modicum of respect. I’ll be the first to volunteer if you ever want to learn. But if you’re not interested in that, politely decline to answer. It’s easy to blame the celebrity, dragged into answering these questions. But really, the fault lies with the media. Please, please, please journalists: stop asking celebrities about fan fiction. Unless you’re having an in-depth conversation about fictional constructions of the actors’ personae (like the very one you’ll be presenting in your piece?), it serves no purpose. Non-fans likely don’t get it; fans think you look like a bully – because you are.”

(via otterymary)

lokiloo:

I was looking through Flower Language meanings and I saw that grass can mean ‘homosexual love’ and now I’m crying myself in laughter imagining some guy dumping lawn clippings onto his crush’s porch screaming ‘I FUCCKIN LOVE U YOU GAY PIECE OF SHIT’.

More generally, I was writing about a very angry and deeply misogynistic group of people. These aren’t the cuddly nerds we made movies about in the 80’s. They’re very angry that the cheerleader still wants to go out with the quarterback instead of the men (boys) who are running the universe right now. The women they surround themselves with aren’t women who challenge them (and frankly, no woman who could challenge them would be interested in being anywhere near them.) —Aaron Sorkin said this about The Social Network, but I think it’s especially relevant with gamergate (via note-a-bear)

http://lefthandsuzukimethod.tumblr.com/post/100471847418/nuts-of-wonder-apparently-karla-souzas

nuts-of-wonder:

Apparently Karla Souza’s character, Laurel Castillo, on How to Get Away With Murder was originally written as Laurel Wilden, a white character, but she asked the writers if they could change her into a latina and they did.

Karla Souza could’ve easily played a white…

actualmenacebuckybarnes:

magpieandwhale:

Fun fact! The indignant English bartender in this scene is the same actor who played tiny Steve.

Fun fact! After seeing Steve gazing longingly at Peggy, Bucky waited for Steve to leave his side then prepositioned the indignant English bartender for a night of angst-ridden lookalike sex.

http://noelfshr.tumblr.com/post/100463641711/goodkwuestion-fansofshameless-all-of-these

goodkwuestion:

fansofshameless:

All of these Connor/Oliver and Ian/Mickey comparisons are really bothersome.

They are very different, the only similarity is that both couples are gay. Connor is in very few- if any -ways like Mickey, just as Oliver is in very ways like Ian.

I have…

birdystark:

when you type too fast and send “holy hit”

image

Monolinguals often assume that this kind of switching happens because speakers are not competent in one of their languages - a sort of deficit hypothesis - or because a concept just can’t be expressed in one of the languages - a sort of lexical gap explanation. Analysis of recorded multilingual speech doesn’t support these ideas, however. Speakers who code-switch the most often are usually those who are the most fluent in both of their languages, and there are linguistic rules about where in a sentence a switch can happen. —

Van Herk, What Is Sociolinguistics, chapter 11. (via transliterations)

The Wikipedia article on code-switching has a nice classification of the types and linguistic rules involved: 

  • Intersentential switching occurs outside the sentence or the clause level (i.e. at sentence or clause boundaries). It is sometimes called "extrasentential" switching. In Assyrian-English switching one could say, “Ani wideili. What happened?” (“Those, I did them. What happened?”)
  • Intra-sentential switching occurs within a sentence or a clause. In Spanish-English switching one could say, “La onda is to fight y jambar." ("The in-thing is to fight and steal.”)
  • Tag-switching is the switching of either a tag phrase or a word, or both, from one language to another, (common in intra-sentential switches). In Spanish-English switching one could say, “Él es de México y así los criaron a ellos, you know.” (“He’s from Mexico, and they raise them like that, you know.”)
  • Intra-word switching occurs within a word itself, such as at a morpheme boundary. In Shona-English switching one could say, “But ma-day-s a-no a-ya ha-ndi-si ku-mu-on-a. (“But thesedays I don’t see him much.”) Here the English plural morpheme -s appears alongside the Shona prefix ma-, which also marks plurality.


(via petrichorlore)

officialnatasharomanoff:

my anaconda don’t want none unless you love and respect clint barton as a useful, valuable member of the avengers

©ff themes